Questions and answers

JPEG Autorotate 3: What does the “Watch folder:” toggle do?

Try copying new unrotated photos into the folder you’ve selected while that toggle is on. It should detect the new files and rotate those photos automatically.

Should autororate work if the target folder is on a USB drive?

JPEG Autorotate doesn’t care or even detect what type of media (internal, external, network drive) the files and folders are on. Providing a reliable file system for it to operate on, is up to Windows and ultimately, your hardware.

How do I rotate individual files?

You can rotate individual files in Windows File Explorer by right clicking them and selecting Autorotate

In the app window itself, there is an icon at the top left of the app window that looks like a List.

Clicking it brings up a dock on the left side of the app window. When you have folder selected, this dock shows all the files in the folder.

When you click on an individual file there, you can choose to auto-rotate or manually rotate it. It also shows you a preview of how the auto-rotated image would look like.

Is it really possible to rotate JPEG photos without quality loss?

Yes!

You may already know that, JPEG in itself is a lossy file format. This means that usually when you edit a photo (say, in Photoshop), there is a slight quality loss every time you save the file.

However, there is an exception to this in certain cases, as explained by Ammara:

Lossless JPEG Rotation allows a JPEG image to be rotated in 90 degree increments without requiring re-compression (thereby avoiding the loss). This is particularly useful for rotating digital photos taken in portrait orientation or correcting the orientation of scans.

For more info, see Preconditions for lossless rotating.

Invalid SOS parameters

I have recently changed my smartphone for a Galaxy S6 ang the software refuses to work. the error is : “Invalid sos parameters for sequential JPEG”. Has anyone solved this problem ?

DUPRE Guillaum

Some phones produce “non-standard” JPEGs.

JPEG Autorotate 2 has an issue with non-standard JPEG metadata, and can’t rotate photos that have such metadata.

JPEG Autorotate 3 fixes these issues. Solving this was a lot of work, so I ask you to purchase JPEG Autorotate 3 Boosted to automatically rotate these photos. The free version has a limitation of being able to rotate just a couple of these images.

Problem with cyrillic/international characters

JPEG Autorotate 2 has an issue with international characters and can’t rotate photos with those in the filenames.

JPEG Autorotate 3 fixes these issues. The free version has a limitation of being able to rotate just a couple of these images. For unlimited rotating of such images, please buy a Boosted or Pro license.

Issues with Windows 7

Using your software in Windows 7 32-bit. Works great. I’ve been re-orienting a lot of photos from my iPhone. For some reason, Windows Photo Viewer doesn’t orient the photos correctly which is annoying.

It appears that the solution is to disable automatic rotating in Windows import tool. That option messes up the metadata in your photos.

Go to Import Pictures and Videos -> Import settings (or More options, I’m not sure) -> Uncheck the option “Rotate pictures on import”

Photos with no Orientation tag

Some cameras do not store the orientation data at all, so JPEG-EXIF autorotate can’t rotate photos from those devices.

JPEG Autorotate 3 shows the rotate preview when you show the folder pane and click a photo to show. This way, you can verify your photos contain the necessary metadata.

You can also check if your photos contain the orientation data by entering a photo that should be portrait but has not been rotated yet, at exifdata.com. On the results page, scroll to the bottom of the list to find “Orientation”. If the Orientation value is “Horizontal (normal)”, then the file you uploaded does not contain portrait orientation data – either because it never was in the file, or because it has been cleared, for example after already having been rotated.

No write permissions

Another common problem is that you don’t have write permissions to the photos/JPEG files or to the folder containing them, so JPEG Autorotate can not change the files.

  • Some cameras do not store the orientation data at all, so JPEG-EXIF autorotate can’t work at all. See above: “Photos with no Orientation tag”
  • Another common problem is that you don’t have write permissions to the photos/JPEG files or to the folder containing them, so JPEG Autorotate can not change the files.

How does the app recognize files as photos?

JPEG Autorotate rotates files that have a file extension that is any of: jpg, jpeg, jfif, jpe (with any of the letters possibly in uppercase).

Version 2 (and older) of JPEG Autorotate has issues with international filenames, which JPEG Autorotate 3 fixes.

If you would like functionality to recognize photos purely based on JPEG/JFIF metadata present in the file, please contact support so we will know there’s interest.

How did this get made? Who is making this?

In circa 2005, I used to have a Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z2 camera, which let me rotate photos, but actually didn’t really rotate them. It just edited the EXIF orientation metadata in the JPEG file, like most (all?) cameras do.

I found a solution by Thomas Bonfort that turned the EXIF data into a rotated photo, enhanced it to work in most Windows machines and made a Windows installer with NSIS. Uses jpegtran, jhead and ImageMagick. Some parts compressed with 7-Zip as SFX.

JPEG Autorotate was previously known as JPEG-EXIF Autorotate. Previous websites for it have been on pilpi.net and on savolai.net. jpegrotate.com was acquired in 2019 for JPEG Autorotate 3.

I two computers. Do I need to buy two licenses?

Licenses for JPEG Autorotate 3 are tied to the user, not to a particular device.

Install the app on any device you use regularly, and enjoy!

Can I support your work?

You could buy JPEG Autorotate 3 when it lands. 🙂
Support development: Donate on my Patreon page.
Like it on social medias: Facebook page of JPEG Autorotate